What to Read While You’re Waiting to Read the Mueller Report


On Friday afternoon, Robert S. Mueller III, the particular counsel, delivered his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election — and whether or not Donald Trump and his associates conspired with Russia or obstructed justice — to Attorney General William P. Barr.

It’s nonetheless unclear how a lot of the report Barr will share with Congress, and with the public. Those who’re keen to learn it might be in for a wait.

Not to fear, there’s lots to learn in the meantime.

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When Trump fired F.B.I. director James Comey in May 2017, it triggered a speedy cascade of occasions inside the Department of Justice that in the end led to Mueller’s appointment as particular counsel. In this mega-best vendor, Comey describes his position in the high-stakes investigation into ties between the Trump marketing campaign and Russia.

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Harding, a correspondent for The Guardian, explores Trump’s decades-long entanglements with Russia in what his publisher describes as a conspiracy “so huge it involves international espionage, offshore banks, sketchy real estate deals, the Miss Universe pageant, mobsters, money laundering, poisoned dissidents, computer hacking, and the most shocking election in American history.” Harding delves into Trump’s deals with Deutsche Bank and examines Trump’s campaign manager Paul Manafort’s extensive ties to Russian and Ukranian oligarchs.

(It’s an exhaustive account, but by now, it’s a bit out of date: The book came out in 2017, many indictments and plea deals ago.)

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Isikoff and Corn, two veteran journalists in Washington, lay out how Russia unleashed hackers and internet trolls to disrupt the 2016 presidential election. They also explore the puzzling ties between Trump and his associates and Russian officials.

In a review for The Times, the Times journalist Steven Lee Myers, the author of “The New Tsar: The Rise and Reign of Vladimir Putin,” wrote: “For anyone who believes in the better angels of American politics, ‘Russian Roulette’ is a depressing book. The Russian hacking, it is now clear, simply exploited the vulgarity already plaguing American political campaigns, which churn on spin and strategy (and money) far more than vision or values.”

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In “The Apprentice,” Miller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who has covered national security for The Washington Post, details how Russia exploited American technology platforms to spread misinformation, damaging Hillary Clinton and boosting Trump, while at the same time hacking and releasing Democratic emails, further inflaming partisan divisions in an already nasty campaign. He also explores links between Trump and his associates and Russia, but steers clear of speculation about what the ultimate revelations regarding Trump’s possible complicity might be.

“Miller makes no pretense about knowing the end of the story and acknowledges that at this point he does not know whether the special counsel, Robert Mueller, will accuse the president of any crimes,” a critic wrote in The Washington Post.



Source link Nytimes.com

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