UW High School Global Health Day opens doors to the world for Wisconsin students – Global Health Institute – UW–Madison


Two female high school students listen to a speaker.

Teachers sit next to each other at a table.
Teachers Janice Verhulst from Janesville Parker and Abby Gunther from Janesville Craig see new alternatives for their students at the UW-Madison High School Global Public Health Day.

MADISON—While a whole bunch of Wisconsin highschool soccer followers streamed into Camp Randall Stadium Friday, Nov. 16, for the highschool playoffs, 77 students gathered in a quiet, ethereal room on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus to study that international well being opens profession doors they by no means anticipated—of their communities and throughout the world.

Students from the Clinton, Janesville Craig, Janesville Parker, Marshall, Milton, Portage and Sun Prairie excessive faculties spent the day at “Opening Doors to the World,” the sixth annual High School Global Public Health Day at UW-Madison. Hosted by the UW-Madison Global Health Institute (GHI) and the South Central Region Area Health Education Center (AHEC), the program is designed to present students the some ways they are often concerned in public well being and the way social and environmental situations lead to very completely different well being outcomes.

Program leader Maria Moreno sits between two high school girls at global health day.
Maria Moreno, GHI affiliate for Experiential Education, works with students throughout the sixth annual High School Global Public Health Day at UW-Madison.

“This is the only opportunity we have to bring students together in an educational platform where they learn to apply what they’re doing,” says Nancy Ondal Ziegler, a Portage High School trainer. “Students are learning about how to make a difference in their high school, in their community, in college, and they can expand on that knowledge and take it globally.”

Janesville Parker trainer Janice Verhulst incorporates the international well being day into her curriculum. Janesville Craig trainer Abby Gunther says she appreciates that students see life isn’t the identical throughout the world.

For Sun Prairie trainer Susan Goudreau, the day exhibits her medical occupations and Certified Nursing Assistant students new profession alternatives. “The vastness is incredible in the places in the world that need assistance, not just in the U.S.,” she says. “There’s more than just getting your degree: It’ll take you so many places to help so many people. I hope some of them take that step.”

Two male high school students listen to speakers
Portage highschool students Travis Miller, proper, and Isaac Brockley discover inspiration and find out about international well being disparities at the sixth annual High School Global Public Health Day.

This was the second yr Portage students Isaac Brockley and Travis Miller attended the occasion. “As students, it’s crucial for us to be aware of disparities, not only global but in Wisconsin,” Miller says. “Global health is here, there and everywhere. It’s important for students to be educated about such an important topic.”

Brockley plans to be a nurse, and the day conjures up him to work internationally. Clinton pupil Lauren Corral appreciates the probability to go to with medical students. “You get to see another side of the world,” she says.

UW students from GlobeMed at UW-Madison, Partners in Health-Engage Madison and Wisconsin MEDLIFE, who organized and offered the program, want they might have attended a highschool international well being day. MEDLIFE president Diane Xue from Germantown grew up understanding what a physician or a nurse did, however nobody talked about public well being, she says. High School Global Health Day additionally lets pupil organizations share their enthusiasm for international well being and offers highschool students a “great opportunity to meet people who’ll be part of global health,” she says.

The day introduces students to UW-Madison and to international well being, says Maria Moreno, GHI affiliate for Experiential Education. Chris Percy, an AHEC program coordinator, says it additionally  promotes careers in public well being: “These kids are still figuring out what they’re doing to do. (The day) gets a lot of wheels turning.”

Teachers sit next to each other at a table.
Teachers Susan Goudreau from Sun Prairie, left, and Amy Kenyon from Milton see new alternatives for their students at the UW-Madison High School Global Public Health Day.

That’s what Milton school-to-career coordinator Amy Kenyon seems to be for as she encourages her students to assume outdoors the field. Milton is small, so students don’t typically see all the alternatives out there, she says. “Our world is based in a global environment. They need to see the implications of all the other countries and how we work together to solve issues in health … This is an opportunity they would not get in a small town, not at all.”

The South Central Region AHEC is a part of a nationwide community of applications devoted to connecting students to careers, professionals to communities, and communities to higher well being.

GHI is dedicated to bettering well being for all right this moment and tomorrow by addressing the multi-layered causes of illness. The institute fosters analysis, training and outreach collaboration throughout disciplines and encourages the sustainable use of world assets. For extra info, go to ghi.wisc.edu.

By Ann Grauvogl/ November 19, 2018



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